Spring 2017 Lift cover features Rachael Carlevale, Founder of Ganjasana, with makeup by Monica Alvarez, photo shot by Jeff Skeirik, courtesy of Cosmic Sister; Sustainable outfit by Teeki

Spring 2017 Lift cover features Rachael Carlevale, Founder of Ganjasana, with makeup by Monica Alvarez, photo shot by Jeff Skeirik, courtesy of Cosmic Sister; Sustainable outfit by Teeki


I found Rachael of Ganjasana to be a true steward of the medicine. She shared her knowledge and wisdom from her own journey with the plant from seed to consumption, and led us through a deep and intentional practice. The space she created allowed me to have new insights and revelations about myself and my body. It was really fun to practice this way within a group of new friends and I recommend Ganjasana to beginner and advanced yoga practitioners alike and even to those new to cannabis altogether.
— Liana of Sensi Magazine

The practice of Ganjasana,” states Rachael, “is rooted in the Shipibo philosophy– guiding individuals in creating a respectful relationship with the master cannabis plant, and how to use the practices of yoga, meditation and mindfulness to deepen that connection for health and wellbeing. Ganjasana is beyond the simple pairing of cannabis and yoga, and aims to educate individuals on all aspects of plant medicine, from soil to flower, and how to integrate with the plant spirit for profound healing.

Sensi Magazine | Cannabis In The House; Robyn Lawrence - July 2017 

Ganjasana yoga founder Rachael Carlevale, who lives with her husband on a hemp farm in Berthoud, Colorado, keeps plants in her living room and on a kitchen window sill alongside aloe (which she says is a great cloning agent). Carlevale trims off leaves to make organic juice that she drinks for health reasons. “Cannabis is a plant, like any other plant, that happens to have medicinal properties,” she says. “It’s also a very beautiful plant.

The Denver Post | The Cannabist: Yoga and Cannabis: Ganjasana Melds Plant Science and an Ancient Tradition; Bruce Kennedy - May 2017

Carlevale describes her system as a blending as well; what she calls a “conscious pairing of regenerative cannabis plant medicine with the practices of yoga, meditation and mindfulness.... Ganjasana, she says, became part of a mission: “to help people build a relationship with the plant medicine.
— Bruce Kennedy of The Denver Post | The Cannabist
Rachael Carlevale is the founder of Colorado-based Ganjasana. (Photo by Jeff Skeirik / Rawtographer; makeup by Monica Alvarez; image provided by @CosmicSister)

Rachael Carlevale is the founder of Colorado-based Ganjasana. (Photo by Jeff Skeirik / Rawtographer; makeup by Monica Alvarez; image provided by @CosmicSister)


Direct Cannabis Network | Entrepreneur of the Week: Rachael Carlevale | May 2017 

Photo by Tracey Eller for Cosmic Sister.

Photo by Tracey Eller for Cosmic Sister.

What is the best piece of advice you can give to others looking to launch a business in the cannabis industry?

RC: Patients over profits! Think about why exactly you want to get into the industry and how you can positively impact the ‘greater good.’ With every business decision you make, ensure you are respecting the three main ethics of permaculture- earth care, people care, fair share. How do your decisions impact the environment, the people and how can you ensure everyone gets their fair share? We are all in this together for the plant! Look at mother nature, see how she works all her living organisms into one harmonious ecosystem. We must model nature to regenerate and thrive!
— Direct Cannabis Network

Know Cannabis Talks | Interview with Ganjasana; Hurst Studios - May 2017 


Marijuana Packaging | Cannabis for Health Takes an Active Approach with Ganjasana Yoga; Bertram Joyner - May 2017 

There’s more to Ganjasana than simply taking a rip off the water pipe and striking a downward dog pose. Rather Carlevale’s self-proclaimed “ceremonies” incorporate elements of Hatha yoga, pranayama, spiritual practice, and cannabis-rooted botanical medicine as taught to her by Peruvian shamans in the Shipibo tradition. Students are prohibited from any warm up tokes prior to the beginning of the class. Instead, Ganjasana finds Carlevale providing the cannabis, allowing her to ensure that the weed is grown from organic, regenerative soil. Regenerative cannabis is a cornerstone of Ganjasana since it helps to sustain the ecosystem. This falls in line with a basic philosophy of Ganjasana that connects its students to the bounties of the earth.
— Marijuana Packaging

LA Yoga Magazine |  Why Women are Leading the Charge to Re(unite) Cannabis and Yoga; April Short - April 2017

Rachael Carlevale, founder of Ganjasana, with cannabis plant. Photo by Tracey Eller (ellerimages.com), courtesy @CosmicSister

Rachael Carlevale, founder of Ganjasana, with cannabis plant. Photo by Tracey Eller (ellerimages.com), courtesy @CosmicSister

After they set their intentions for working with “the plant medicine,” the yogis are immersed in permaculture education designed to get to the source of the cannabis plant—the soil. Worms move through their fingers as they interact with the compost at the center of the circle.

“Feeling the worms move through our fingers allowed us to deeply connect with the life source of our ganja plant medicine,” Carlevale says.

Pranayama is next, then the group collectively partakes in collective, conscious consumption of the cannabis plant.

“We are quiet, no talking when consuming; it is a sacred time to turn inward and quiet the mind,” Carlevale says. “Our ceremonies are designed to model #nature, to align with her natural rhythms, to connect with cannabis plant spirit medicine.”
Carlevale is a Boulder, Colorado-based yoga teacher and cannabis advocate who, through the feminist cannabis and psychedelics education and advocacy network Cosmic Sister, has worked with plant medicines over several years under the guidance of ayahuasca shamans in the Amazon. Ganjasana pairs yoga with the ancient plant ceremony traditions of the Shipibo indigenous people of the Amazon to tap into the lessons of the cannabis plant.
— April Short for LA Yoga Magazine

303 Magazine |  Where to Practice Cannabis Yoga in Denver; Lynn Koves - April 2017 



Rachael also speaks on how plants can be extraordinary teachers in our lives, and a great accompaniment to a mindful yoga practice. She touches on the ancient of practice of women coming together during their menstrual cycle to use the plant medicine, part of what inspired Rachael to hold ongoing events called “The Green Tent: A Women’s Cannabis Yoga Circle.
— Ryan Rockwell for YogiApproved.com

Organic Authority | 7 Reasons You Need CBD Oil in Your Kitchen (and Medicine Cabinet); Emily Monaco - January 2017 


The Cannabist | A Front-row Seat at a Cannabis Wedding; January 2017


Civilized.Life | Budmaid Goodie Bags for Today's Cannabis Bride; Zoe Helene, January 2017 


Civilized.Life | Higher Love: A Cannabis Plant Spirit Wedding; Zoe Helene - January 2017 



VICE | Broadley | Feminists Are Going to the Amazon to Drink Ayahuasca; Gabby Bess - December 29, 2016


AlterNet | 4 Ways Yoga's History is Fundamentally linked with Cannabis; April Short - September 16, 2016


The Daily Camera | 420 Games in Boulder; September 2016

Boulder doesn’t have a Power Plant branch (at least not yet), but it does have Ganjasana events ( ganjasana.com), yoga ceremonies that incorporate cannabis — like a mid-August event in Boulder’s Highland City Club. Ganjasana has a less athletic base and promotes “healing cannabis plant-spirit yoga ceremonies” that also involve meditation and mindfulness.
— Aimee Heckel for the Daily Camera



Guests were treated to an experience full of mindfully consuming cannabis and being aware of not only themselvesbut of the energy and properties of this unbelievable plant. Reminding us to always continue our knowledge about sustainability, remaining mindful of our intentions, educating yourself on edibles, and staying present with each breathe in and out. This was the premier transformational experience with Ganjasana.
— Maggie for Love and Marij



The Travel Joint | Ganjasana Culinary Event - April 2016 

Rachael Carlevale, Founder of Ganjasana in her regenerative cannabis garden 

Rachael Carlevale, Founder of Ganjasana in her regenerative cannabis garden 

Founder and Instructor Rachel Carlevale takes the ganja yoga art to new heights and offers up a truly bespoke experience based on the principles of permaculture, Ganjasana values cannabis cultivated in no-till, living organic soil and grown with safe and sustainably conscious methods. These methods are mindful of the health of the plant, the environment and the people. Ganjasana offers transformative experiences, building meaningful relationships with heirloom genetic cultivars that in turn allow for deepened plant spirit communication.
— The Travel Joint

Rachael Carlevale in the Amazon Jungle on her week long Ayahuasca ceremony with Zoe Helene and Chris Kilham. Photo by Misia Landau, courtesy of Cosmic Sister 

Rachael Carlevale in the Amazon Jungle on her week long Ayahuasca ceremony with Zoe Helene and Chris Kilham. Photo by Misia Landau, courtesy of Cosmic Sister 

It was on one of these trips that Helene met the first guinea pig recipient of the Plant Spirit Grant, Rachael Carlevale. Carlevale met kilham though his class, The Shaman’s Pharmacy, which brought students to the jungle of Iquitos, Peru to live with native Shipibo practitioners. Carlevale was a pre-med senior student at the time, and had become fed-up with the program’s heavy focus on prescribing pharmaceuticals, and answering problems with pills.
— April Short for Alternet



Carlevale’s open-minded approach to holistic menstrual wellness includes yoga and — you guessed it — cannabis. Citing Queen Victoria as a cannabis user for menstrual pain relief in the 19th century, Carlevale explains to SheKnows, “Cannabis is a wonderful companion plant to aid menstrual cramps, headaches, pain and uplifts spirits. I prefer heavy indica cannabis cultivars during my cycle, as they are known pain relievers. When approaching the use of edibles, start with slow and small solutions. And be sure to know your cannabis source before consuming. I prefer organic soil-grown cannabis.
— Bethany Ramos of SheKnows